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Simple Things That Really Matter

Sherif Rizq

People who travel a lot see the same things; yet, they react differently to the same encounters. More often than not, the way we react reflects who we are. Among our most prized possessions are our own simple things that stay in our mind and heart forever.

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Relativity and diversity – You and I

Sherif Rizq

Relativity and diversity are corner stones in understanding the complexities of this world, Herb Cohen said “You and I don’t see things as they are we see things as we are” and that explains how relative everything can be, it explains that what’s normal to someone is not necessarily normal to everyone else, and in fact, it shouldn’t be. What’s normal to you is only normal to you because you are unique, and everyone else is unique as well.

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Elastic legitimacy: how legitimate was Mursi’s leadership?

Military helicopters fly above Tahrir Square. Egypt's revolution

Sherif Rizq

One can’t define a political term the same way any time any where. Time and place may add a bit of a different context. Contextualization is a key word to understand what’s happening anywhere anytime in the world. So, this is the case in Egypt as well. The way the Muslim Brotherhood defines legitimacy, for example, depends completely on whether the definition would serve them best or not. When Mubarak, the former president, was ousted in Feb 11 -2011, he was a legitimate president. He was elected in 2005, so it was quite unconstitutional to force him to resign, but the Muslim Brotherhood insisted on the legitimacy of the revolution. Now when millions headed everywhere in Egypt, they definitely outnumbered the people who demonstrated in 2011, they had the same claim of legitimacy of the revolution, yet the Muslim Brotherhood insisted on the legitimacy of the ballots.

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Since when does “DESERVE” mean anything?!

Men of honor

Sherif Rizk 

The sentence “Since when does DESERVE” mean anything?” was part of a dialogue in the movie MEN OF HONOR for Robert De Niro and Cuba Gooding Jr. It is the story of Carl Brashear, the first African American, then also the first amputee, US Navy Diver and the man who trained him. In the dialogue Brashear the african American guy told his trainer that he deserves to graduate and the trainer’s answer was so realistic “Since when does deserve mean anything?”

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Egypt is condemning the Syrian regime, but rhetoric is never enough.

Sherif Rizq

The Egyptian president Mursi has proven a great ability in classic rhetoric that was once effective around the beginning of the century, but not anymore. In his speech in the nonaligned countries meeting held in Iran last month he condemned the Al Assad regime by calling the uprising “a revolution against an oppressive regime,” thereby triggering a walk out by the Syrian delegation. Mursi used very old-fashioned wording that just doesn’t find any resonance anymore, using the moral commitment in a world that only acknowledges power. His rhetoric has to have a touch of reality.

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Christians and Muslims united against intolerance

Karem Issa

The anti-Islam film Innocence of Muslims is insulting and intentionally provocative, so muslims across the world are justified in their anger. Nevertheless, any violence against innocent people is completely unjustified. Just as the source of anger is a misrepresentation of Islam and the message of the Prophet Muhammad, so too are some of the violent reactions which followed.

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In denial about Holocaust denial

Sherif A Rizk

Holocaust is the term generally used to describe the genocide of approximately six million European Jews during World War II, a program of systematic state-sponsored extermination by Nazi Germany. But, why do so many people refuse to admit that fact that the Jews were persecuted and burned by the Nazi?

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Egypt’s unfinished business

Baraa Shiban

As if Tahrir Square was reborn by a new revolutionary pulse fueled by the martyrs blood. The people who were once accused of killing them are now set free by a verdict from the court of law, and the person who ordered these killings is sentenced to life. Tens of thousands of Egyptians fled to the square, and announced that the only legitimacy for the coming president will come from the midst of the square. Read More…

Plagued by politicians

Sherif A Rizk

“It’s your disease that kills me, not mine!”, says Asmaa in “Asmaa”, a very significant Egyptian film that reflects the social and political scene in contemporary Egypt; a country whose people have always been doomed to suffer from the illnesses of their leaders and the fatal mistakes of their politicians. The outcome is an incessant number of defeats over the years not to mention a host of political syndromes that may last forever. When one speculates on the current situation, it is easily noticed how dominant the political  ideology is, no matter how irrelevant it is to the demands of the realities of the people.

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Why freedom is life

Sherif A Rizk

Freedom of thought and belief is a universally basic human right, but because people automatically pass on their beliefs from one generation to another, the ability to think, analyse, criticize, judge, and sometimes unlearn such values so long believed in and cherished becomes very limited.

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